At the Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, we currently implement 15 projects in the following areas:

Autonomous Systems

Autonomous coordinated navigation of drones

Principal Investigator
Prof Chiranjib Bhattacharyya (Professor, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems and Department of Computer Science and Automation)

The broad objective of the project is to achieve autonomous navigation of multiple drones. There are several important problems that need to be answered before we could achieve this objective. We would like to study these questions in the context of Smart Cities, to enable applications  such as delivery of essential supplies like medicines/organs etc. across the city.

Our long-term goals are: (1) Design of drones which can cover city wide areas, (2) suggest infrastructure which could potentially be used in a city for drones, and (3) autonomous navigation strategies for multiple drones.

The goals for the first project year are:  (1) Creating an infrastructure for drones, (2) designing of drones, (3) autonomous navigation of a single drone with GPS, and (4) state perception using computer vision for drones.


Development of chemotactic robots

Principal Investigator
Prof Manoj Varma (Associated Professor, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems and Centre for Nano Science and Engineering)

Through this “expedition project”, our team envisions, perhaps the first of its kind, systematic study of robot olfaction leading to a demonstrable robotic platform which can sense and navigate towards a chemical source. The project will involve behavioural and neurobiological studies of olfaction in C. Elegans, a microscopic worm which will be our model system to study sensory signal processing in living organism.

Project Publications

1.

Harshitha, S K; Harkar, Shalini; Mishra, Ayushi; Joge, Shubham; Singh, Varsha; Varma, Manoj

Social intelligence in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Conference Forthcoming

Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Complex Systems, 17.-22.09.17, Cancun (Mexico), Forthcoming.

BibTeX


Understanding swarming and collective motion in bacterial populations

Principal Investigator
Prof Manoj Varma (Associated Professor, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems and Centre for Nano Science and Engineering)

One of the hallmarks of a cyber-physical system is the emergence of collective intelligence from the individual elements of the system. For instance, the synthesis of a decision based on multimodal sensory information from the individual nodes of a sensor network. Complex living organisms can also be considered as cyber-physical systems because their survival depends on taking the right decisions based on the collective information gathered from their sensing organs as well as possibly from their neighbours.

In this context, bacteria and similar microbes present an excellent test-bed to study how collective intelligence emerges in a biological system. Given the fact that such systems have evolved over millions of years, the methods they use for decision making and for dealing with noise may be near-optimal and may give us valuable insights in the design of non-living cyber-physical systems.

Project Publications

1.

Harshitha, S K; Harkar, Shalini; Mishra, Ayushi; Joge, Shubham; Singh, Varsha; Varma, Manoj

Social intelligence in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Conference Forthcoming

Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Complex Systems, 17.-22.09.17, Cancun (Mexico), Forthcoming.

BibTeX


Smart City Systems

Smart city test bed

Principal Investigator
Prof Bharadwaj Amrutur (Chairman, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems)

The Indian Government has identified Smart Cities as a priority area for development in the coming years. ICT will play a key role in supporting smart city solutions and more specifically, IoT technologies will be a key enabler for providing the “smarts”. The requirements from citizens in cities is diverse and cuts across many different verticals like transportation, water management, solid waste management, smart parking, etc. Typically, each vertical will be addressed by a different vendor, who will provide an end-to-end solution. However it has been recognized of late, that a better approach might be to have a horizontal approach where in sensors, and other data are made available across different silos – in order to foster new, cost effective solutions to various city related problems and citizen needs. A simple example is that of a camera sensor which can aid in not only in surveillance but also in crowd management, smart parking, transit operations management etc. applications. Hence there is a need to develop smart city ICT/IoT framework as a generic platform that will support a diverse set of applications.

Project Publications

1.

Amrutur, Bharadwaj; Rajaraman, Vasanth; Acharya, Srikrishna; Ramesh, Rakshit; Joglekar, Ashish; Sharma, Abhay; Simmhan, Yogesh; Lele, Abhijit; Mahesh, Ashwin; Sankaran, Sathya

An open Smart City IoT test bed: Street light poles as Smart City spines Conference

Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Internet-of-Things Design and Implementation (IoTDI), 18.-21.04.17, Pittsburgh (USA), 2017.

Abstract | BibTeX | Links:

2.

Sharma, Abhay; Acharya, Srikrishna; Rajaraman, Vasanth; Ramesh, Rakshit; Babu, Arun; Amrutur, Bharadwaj

Schemas for IoT interoperability for Smart Cities Conference Forthcoming

Proceedings of the 15th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, 05.-09.11.17, Delft (The Netherlands), Forthcoming.

Abstract | BibTeX


Efficient architectures and algorithms for distributed video analytics for Smart Cities

Principal Investigator
Prof Bharadwaj Amrutur (Chairman, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems)

Most of the smart city components, as articulated by the 20 candidate cities chosen for Smart City implementation by the Indian Government, can greatly benefit by the use of cameras as sensing devices. Examples include surveillance, smart parking, transit management, etc. This is not surprising as cameras are a very versatile and rich sensor and hence one can extract useful information to enable a diverse set of applications. However, the negative is the high data bandwidth required to transfer data from the cameras to the computing center. Hence it is imperative that one explore ways of analyzing the camera data at the edge so that only useful information is sent to the computing center, thus minimizing bandwidth. At the same time, the whole system needs to be flexible enough to allow programmatic control of what useful information to extract as this depends on the actual application. Hence this forms the basic premise and problem for this proposal.

Project Publications

1.

Bhargava, Srivatsa; Gorur, Pushkar; Amrutur, Bharadwaj

A distributed object detector-tracker aided video encoder for smart camera networks Conference Forthcoming

11th International Conference on Distributed Smart Cameras (ICDSC), 05.-07.09.17, Stanford (USA), Forthcoming.

BibTeX


Design of large-scale IoT networks

Principal Investigator
Prof Rajesh Sundaresan (Professor, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Department of Electrical Communication Engineering)

A well-designed communication network that provides reliable quality of service (QoS) guarantees is a critical platform on which a variety of novel cyber-physical system (CPS) applications can be built. When designed well, the CPS entities can seamlessly talk to each other, and the network acts merely as a transparent enabler. When designed poorly, bottlenecks, congestions, delays, etc. that develop can choke not only CPS applications and but also the development of new CPS applications.

We are at a point in time where large scale IoT deployments, those that can improve delivery of societal services, are just beginning – smart meters at homes, safety monitoring of equipments, mobile health, improved distribution and leakage detection in water networks, among many others. Many innovative services are also being developed around such applications. It will not be long before IoT data starts flooding the network. It is therefore crucial that the right design decision choices are made at this stage, when the IoT networks are being planned, because once deployed, there is always reluctance to modify them.


IISc Smart Campus: Closing the loop from network to knowledge

Principal Investigator
Prof Yogesh Simmhan (Assistant Professor, Department of Computational and Data Sciences)

This project proposes to develop an open, integrated and extensible IoT technology stack for Smart Management of campus utilities. The IoT stack brings together hybrid sensing, diverse networking, Big Data analytics and science-driven utility management, and will be validated through affordable and intelligent water resource management for a sustainable campus environment.


Study of India appropriate technology (IoT) solutions for Smart Cities

Principal Investigator
Prof Bharadwaj Amrutur (Chairman, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems)

The Indian Government has launched many national-scale ICT initiatives in the last year. Irrespective of their final mandate, these programs are ultimately driving towards a coherent plan of infrastructure development, service delivery and information transparency for the advancement and empowerment of Indian citizens. ICT will be critical for the successful execution and long-term sustainability of these projects. Among other ICT technologies, the Internet of Things (IoT) can provide a seamless inter-connect between the physical entities with the cyber world with M2M communication and closed-loop control with/without human intervention. Hence, leapfrogging to adopt IoT as the ICT “technology of choice” will be the key to success.

Given the nascent stage of IoT deployments and its immense potential to be the “technology of choice” for Smart Cities development across India, there is an urgent need for: (1) an accreditation framework to lower the barriers for companies to participate in this massive exercise of development of India and (2) enablers for development of India-centric solutions.


Energy Systems

Condition based solar PV plant maintenance and monitoring using sparse, low cost sensors

Principal Investigator
Dr Ashish Joglekar (Member of Technical Staff, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems)

Solar PV plants need to be maintained if they are to continue to work at their rated output and efficiency. But there are various failure modes observed in a PV installation. It is not practical to equip every module with sensors to detect failure modes. Therefore, the project aims to use sparsely placed, low cost sensors and a robust analytics engine to

  • Identify and localise failure modes and reduce plant downtime and repair costs.
  • Optimise plant cleaning schedules (thus reducing usage of water required to clean panels).
  • Improve plant output and efficiency.

Distributed multi-agent algorithms for micro grid control

Principal Investigator
Prof Shalabh Bhatnagar (Professor, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Department of Computer Science and Automation)

A microgrid is a networked group of distributed energy sources with the goal of generating, converting and storing energy. This scenario is being envisaged as an important alternative to the conventional scheme with large power stations transmitting energy over long distances. The microgrid technology is useful particularly in the Indian context where extending power supply from the main grids to remote villages is a challenge. In order to take full advantage of the modularity and flexibility of micro-grid technologies, smart control mechanisms are required to manage and coordinate these distributed energy systems so as to minimize the costs of energy production, conversion and storage, without jeopardizing grid stability.


Manufacturing Systems

A smart manufacturing test bed for biomedical devices

Principal Investigator
Prof Amaresh Chakrabarti (Professor, Centre for Product Design and Manufacturing)

The project proposes to develop a smart factory test bed for research in the area of smart manufacturing at the systems engineering level, for biomedical device applications. The test bed will allow collection of real-time data from all five elements of a factory (people, part, tools, processes, and environment) mainly for the following factory functions: inspection, assembly, rework, and testing.


Industrial Internet of Things for energy efficient assembly lines

Principal Investigator
Prof Rajesh Sundaresan (Professor, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Department of Electrical Communication Engineering)

The industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) will enable one to monitor and track assets in real-time. This creates a potential for data-driven decision making for system and process performance optimisation. While large amounts of data are being gathered, they are not being converted effectively into actionable knowledge. Our goal in this work is to do the following: a) provide a framework for mapping the energy usage landscape in a manufacturing assembly line; and b) optimise energy usage in the assembly line.


Health Systems

A BioCPS approach to understand and control gut-biology (CyberGut)

Principal Investigator
Prof G.K. Ananthasuresh (Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering)

This project focuses on diarrheal diseases, which cause nearly 3,00,000 infant and child mortality in India.  So far, animal models have been developed to understand the functioning of the receptor for the bacterial toxin involved in the disease. What has become apparent from these studies is that in vitro models and computational models not only help understand the disease processes and make way for testing new drugs and therapies. There are open questions such as stochasticity in the response of the gut-epithelial cells to bacterial toxins and the effect of peristalsis on the gut-epithelium. These two aspects prompted a bioCPS approach that this project will pursue.


Affordable and robust E.Coli biosensor development for rapid detection of faecal contamination in water

Principal Investigator
Prof Bharadwaj Amrutur (Chairman, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems)

Globally, 1.8 billion people use drinking water sources contaminated with faeces, and this is a leading cause of diseases such as diarrhoea, cholera, typhoid, and dysentery. Fecal coliform bacteria indicate the presence of sewage contamination of a waterway and the possible presence of other pathogenic organisms. High fecal coliform counts in water indicates that it contains other possible pathogenic strains which can bring about diseases like Typhoid fever, hepatitis, gastroenteritis, dysentery and ear infections. As per WHO guidelines, no fecal coliform should be present in drinking water. Thus, early and rapid detection of fecal coliform bacteria in drinking water with high sensitivity and accuracy, by using an affordable and robust biosensor will help government bodies to take preventive and precautionary measures to avoid health hazards in a community.


A portable fever kit for Dengue and Chikungunya 

Principal Investigator

Prof Manoj Varma (Associated Professor, Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems and Centre for Nano Science and Engineering)

The project aims to develop a proof of concept molecular test which can differential between the viral infections of Dengue and Chikungunya. The research program will also focus on integrating a sample preparation module with the photonic sensors to produce a cartridge-based test that will operate using a single finger stick capillary blood sample and be as easy to operate as a conventional blood sugar meter.