• Fri
    16
    Dec
    2016
    8.30 am - 1.30 pm

    This workshop aims at discussing two specific topics of potential value for addressing mobility problems in Indian cities: (1) Transportation modeling tools and (2) Transportation technologies.

    Bengaluru and other cities in India are experiencing an unprecedented growth in the demand for travel and associated challenges, including traffic congestion, air pollution, declining safety of travellers, and economic impacts. To address these issues, a variety of mobility, policy, and technology solutions are being considered. These include smart city approaches such as mixed land-uses, transit oriented developments, walkable and cyclable neighborhoods, shared mobility, last mile connectivity, and the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) for traffic management. In the face of the multitude of mobility solutions being considered, transportation modeling tools play an important role in the evaluation and design of appropriate solutions.

    Therefore, a specific focus of the workshop will be on the development of modelling tools that can be used to analyze (or simulate) urban travel demand and system performance under alternative scenarios of urban design, mobility policies, and technology solutions.

    Another topic of interest to the workshop is emerging technologies that can potentially revolutionize urban mobility. Such technologies include automated (or the so called driverless), wireless connected, and sensing enabled transportation systems. A reason why these two topics – mobility modelling tools and emerging mobility technologies – will be discussed together is the potential for synergy between the two in addressing urban mobility problems. Therefore, opportunities for such synergies will be discussed as well.

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  • Mon
    02
    Jan
    2017
    10.00-11.00Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    The rise of Internet of Things and cyber-physical systems create new challenges in interconnecting variety of devices and people for the systems to function in a holistic manner to address issues of efficiency, robustness and resilience of systems. As these systems become increasingly complex, there is a need to revisit system engineering approaches, standards, and semantic interoperability.

    This talk will also provide an example of a Smart City project in Downtown Washington, D.C. and the approach taken from both a city management and technology perspective. Further, the talk will address challenges of interoperability by making the case that category theory provides a possible semantic foundation for engineering of such complex interlinked systems.

    Speaker

    Prof Eswaran Subrahmanian, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh

    Short biography

    Eswaran Subrahmanian is a Research Professor at the Engineering Research Accelerator and the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

    His areas of research are engineering design, information modeling for collaborative engineering work, role of standards for product life cycle management, engineering and policy and systems engineering for collaborative work. He has worked on projects with ABB, Bosch, Bombardier, Boeing and Alcoa for creating, deploying, and supporting global systems engineering projects.

    He had been guest researcher at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the USA. He has been Visiting Professor at TU Delft, University of Lyon II and is a Distinguished Visiting Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, UK. He is a Distinguished Scientist of the ACM and Fellow of the American Association of Advancement of Science (AAAS). He is also founding Member of Fields of View in Bangalore, India.

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  • Tue
    10
    Jan
    2017
    5.00-6.00 pmDepartment of Electrical Communication Engineering, Golden Jubilee Hall

    This talk will address VLSI architectures for emerging Internet of Things applications. There are a number of critical concerns: Machine learning and information analytics, reducing energy consumption and silicon area, and enhancing security and preventing piracy. Almost all things should have embedded classifiers to make decisions on data. Thus, reducing energy consumption of features and classifiers is important.

    The first part of the talk will present energy reduction approaches for a medical Internet of Things for monitoring EEG and predicting seizures. In the second part of the talk, I will address hardware security and present approaches to designing circuits that cannot be easily reverse engineered and cannot be pirated. To this end, authentication and obfuscation approaches will be presented.

    Tea/coffee will be served before the talk.

    Speaker

    Prof Keshab K. Parhi, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

    Short biography

    Keshab K. Parhi has been with the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis since 1988, where he is currently Distinguished McKnight University Professor and Edgar F. Johnson Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

    He received the B.Tech. degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in 1982, the M.S.E.E. degree from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia in 1984, and his PhD degree from the University of California, Berkeley in 1988. He published 595 papers, holds 29 patents, and has authored the textbook VLSI Digital Signal Processing Systems (Wiley, 1999) and coedited the reference book Digital Signal Processing for Multimedia Systems (Marcel Dekker, 1999).

    Keshab K. Parhi is widely recognized for his work on high-level transformations of iterative data-flow computations, for developing a formal theory of computing for design of digital signal processing systems, and for his contributions to multi-gigabit Ethernet systems on copper and fiber and for backplanes. His current research addresses VLSI architecture design of signal processing, communications and biomedical systems, error control coders and cryptography architectures, high-speed transceivers, stochastic computing, hardware security, and molecular computing. He is also currently working on intelligent classification of biomedical signals and images, for applications such as seizure prediction and detection, schizophrenia classification, biomarkers for mental disorders, brain connectivity, and diabetic retinopathy screening.

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  • Wed
    18
    Jan
    2017
    4.00 - 5.00 pmRobert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    The talk has two parts: The first part is on the LAAS-CNRS lab and its research related to systems and computing and applications. The second part is on systems engineering, ranging from systems monitoring and bridgening the gap between formal and semi-formal methods with a focus on requirement eliciaition issues and deployment. The seminar ends with actual challenging work of "Can we talk about emergent properties in engineering systems?"  and a follow up debate with the audience on such issue.

    A discussion on various possibilities for students to do PhD and visiting opportunities is part of the lecture.

    Speaker: Prof Abd-El-Kader Sahraoui, Laboratory for Analysis and Architecture of Systems (LAAS), France

    Abd-El-Kader Sahraoui was born in the city of Frenda in the South West of Algeria. He obtained his B.Sc and M.Sc from Manchester University in 1977 and 1979. He has held different positions in industry from 1979 to 1984 and obtained his PhD and D.Sc. degrees from Toulouse University in 1987 and 1994.

    He has been Lecturer, Assistant and Associate Professor at Toulouse University UPS and at Tarbes Engineering Institute ENIT. Currently, he is a Professor at Toulouse II University in the college of IUTB and a Research Associate at LAAS-CNRS of the French Research Council. He has been Associate Researcher at the University of California, Berkeley during the academic year 1999/2000, pursuing research in system engineering for advanced transportation systems. He was Guest Professor and Chair of Requirement Engineering at Hasso Plattner Institute for Systems Software Engineering in Postdam, Germany in the academic year 2001/2002.

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  • Thu
    16
    Feb
    2017
    11-12 pmRBCCPS, Seminar Hall

    Formal modelling is hard and is often difficult to scale for large and complex systems. As part of the AMADEOS project, a tool was designed to facilitate rapid modelling and simulation of system-of-systems (SoS) using a customization of Google Blockly tool. Blockly has been adopted to ease the design of SoS by means of simpler and intuitive user interface; thus requiring minimal technology expertise and support for the SoS designer. This talk will showcase some of the ideas and results of the tool developed for the AMADEOS project.

    Speaker

    Dr P. Arun Babu

    Short biography

    P. Arun Babu worked as a postdoctoral researcher at ResilTech, Pisa for the European Union projects CECRIS (Certification of critical systems) and AMADEOS (Architecture for multi-criticality agile dependable evolutionary open system-of-systems). He received his PhD from Homi Bhabha National Institute at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research in 2013 and his M.Tech. degree from the University of Hyderabad in 2008. He has also worked in industry at Cavium Networks and Progress Software.

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  • Fri
    10
    Mar
    2017
    Sat
    11
    Mar
    2017
    M. S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology (MSRIT)

    The Symposium on Smarter Cities is being organized jointly by Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore and the Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems (RBCCPS), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore under TEQIP-II (Technical Education Quality Improvement Programme) and will be held at Ramaiah Institute of Technology campus on March 10-11, 2017.

    The goal

    Smarter Cities act as a catalyst for economic growth and improve the quality of life of their citizens by developing and implementing area-based technologies and solutions to today’s challenges.

    The goal of the symposium is to provide a platform for domain experts, researchers, practitioners, and students to exchange ideas on technologies and practical experiences related to Smarter Cities. It will cover various aspects of Smarter Cities such as energy, transportation, water, healthcare, education, pollution, tourism and governance with a focus on state-of-the art technologies, methodologies, and best practices.

    Intended audience

    The symposium should be of interest to:

    • Researchers in the Smarter Cities domain
    • Participants in Smarter cities projects
    • Students in engineering and management streams
    • City administrators

    Ideathon

    An "Ideathon", open to students of engineering colleges all over India, will be part of the symposium. We welcome ideas that are novel, practical and of an interdisciplinary nature for solutions to problems related to Smarter Cities. The Ideathon will provide an opportunity to students to interact with experts and present their ideas for solving real-world problems.

    The top three ideas will win cash awards worth a total of Rs. 1,50,000 (First prize – Rs. 75,000; second prize – Rs. 50,000; third prize – Rs. 25,000).

    Please visit the Symposium website for detailed information on the program and the Ideathon.

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  • Mon
    13
    Mar
    2017
    Wed
    29
    Mar
    2017
    RBCCPS, Seminar Hall
    Instructor: Professor K R K Rao, Head of Analog Training at Texas Instruments India, retd. Professor IIT Madras
    Syllabus: The course will introduce a systems approach to analog design via detailed discussion of the following topics:
    • Automatic Gain Control
    • Filter Design
    • Phase Locked Loops
    • Frequency Locked Loops.
    Specially designed experimental kits will be made available to enable the students to learn via laboratory exercises.
    Prerequisites: Curiosity to learn practical analog design.
    Timings:
    Theory: 9.30-10.30 am, Labs: 5-7pm
    Dates: March 13, 15, 17, 20, 22, 24, 27, 29
    The course is fully booked.

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  • Mon
    03
    Apr
    2017
    4-5 pmRBCCPS, Seminar Hall

    Analytics of network telemetry data is useful for addressing many important network operational problems. While Big Data techniques have been pushing scale boundaries for processing data ever further, in many cases the real bottleneck for analytics is the acquisition, i.e. the ability to generate and export the data on which analytics depends.

    To address this issue, the framework distributed network analytics that pushes analytics processing into the network and dynamically sets up data sources as needed. One of the challenges of such a framework concerns providing users with simple ways to articulate network analytics queries and instruct the network which data to generate and provide.

    We have addressed this issue using a model-driven approach that is presented in this talk. Using YANG as a way to model network analytics tasks, our system lets users articulate network analytics tasks at a very high level of abstraction that is subsequently broken down by the framework into lower-level analytics tasks which are deployed across the network.

    Speaker

    Mouli Chandramouli, Cisco

    Short biography

    Mouli Chandramouli has a M.Sc. and Ph.D. degree in Operations Research from the University of Arizona, Tucson. He worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories and Bell Communications Research for ten years in the areas of network performance modeling. Later he worked for the startup Dynamicsoft, that was later acquired by Cisco. He is currently working at Cisco in the area of analytics.

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  • Tue
    11
    Apr
    2017
    10.30-11.30 amRobert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    Dynamical patterns such as spiral waves or target waves occur in a wide variety of natural systems spanning across a range of length scales: From intracellular calcium waves to waves of infection spreading over thousands of kilometers. These patterns also occur in physiological systems such as the heart, uterine myometrium, gastro-intestinal complex and cerebral cortex and are often observed in the context of deviations from the natural rhythm of the organ (arrhythmia). Most prominently, they are implicated in the disturbances to the normal pumping rate in the heart, resulting in cardiac disease, one of the leading causes of death in both the industrialized and developing world. For these reasons, arrhythmias are the subject of intense research.

    Increased availability of experimental data and vastly improved computational power (high performance computation) have enormously facilitated the building of realistic models of these physiological systems, especially the heart. Modelling approaches are most useful in scenarios where they can complement experiments, such as in the investigation of complex spatial patterns of electrical activity that occur in the bulk of the heart during instances of cardiac arrhythmia. Further, models also have applications in drug-testing, prediction and therapeutic interventions in the context of life-threatening arrhythmia.

    In this talk, I will outline the mathematics of excitable media which is used to model the dynamics in these systems. I will briefly discuss the tools of high-performance computation that are used typically for these systems. I will then describe a few results pertinent to the genesis, detection and control of arrhythmia in the context of heart. Finally, I will conclude with a brief discussion on modelling a different kind of pattern, viz, patterns of urban growth and demographic change.

    About the Speaker
    S. Sridhar obtained his Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics from the University of Madras in 2011. His doctoral research carried out at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai, involved investigating the nonlinear dynamics of patterns in biological systems and developing control schemes for spatially extended chaos having potential medical applications.

    After doing a PostDoc in the Chemistry Department at Brandeis University (USA), he joined Scimergent (Data Analytics company based in Chennai) as postdoctoral scientist in 2013 to work on an data-driven approach to study patterns of urbanization and economic networks in India. During 2015-2016, he worked as a Pegasus Marie-Curie Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Physics, Ghent University (Belgium).

    His research interests include, modelling cardiac arrhythmia, pattern formation in biological and chemical systems, and spatiotemporal patterns of development and urbanization in India. He has also co-authored a book on genesis and control of patterns in excitable media and is currently editing a Research Topic on "Simulating Normal and Arrhythmic Dynamics: From Sub-Cellular to Tissue and Organ Level" for Frontiers journal.

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  • Tue
    09
    May
    2017
    Thu
    29
    Jun
    2017
    Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Hands-on Lab

    Instructor: Professor Abd-El-Kader Sahraoui, University of Toulouse and Laboratory for Analysis and Architecture of Systems (LAAS-CNRS)

    Timings

    Lectures: 10.00-12.00 pm on 9, 16, 23 and 30 May (Tuesdays)
    Lab: 4.00-7.00 pm on 7, 8, 14, 15, 21, 22, 28 and 29 June (Tuesdays and Thursdays)

    Syllabus

    The course will give an introduction to Systems Engineering in the CPS context by discussing the following topics:

    • Introduction to Systems Engineering
    • Processes and associated standards
    • Requirements Engineering
    • Process conceptions and architectures
    • Validation and verification
    • Case studies
    • Cyber-Physical Systems

    During the lab, two students will work on applying the development methodology and prototyping to applications in the following domains:

    • Intelligent transport systems
    • CPS applications
    • Co-simulation
    • Distributed computer control and IoT
    • Programming embedded systems on TI Tiva

    Prerequisite

    Basic knowledge on hardware, software and control systems

    Course reading

    Edward A. Lee, Sanjit A. Seshia, Introduction to embedded systems. A cyber-physical systems approach

    Registration

    Unfortunately, the maximum number of participants already registered.


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  • Mon
    05
    Jun
    2017
    Fri
    30
    Jun
    2017
    Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Hands-on Lab

    Instructor: Dr Arun Babu

    Timings

    Every Monday and Friday, starting 5 June (5, 9, 12, 16, 19, 23, 26 and 30 June), 10.30-12.30

    Syllabus

    Cybersecurity deals with processes, techniques, and tools to protect computers and networks from unauthorized access and attacks. This course deals with practical aspects of cybersecurity and teaches various types of attacks and mechanisms to prevent them.

    The following topics will be discussed:

    • Attacks and attackers
    • Vulnerabilities
    • Safe and secure coding practices
    • Basics of cryptography
    • OS security
    • Web security
    • Network security
    • Security through obscurity
    • Malwares
    • Cyberwarefare
    • Cybersecurity in India,
    • Case studies

    Prerequisite

    Knowledge of computer programming and computer networks, familiarity with UNIX like OS, such as Linux/*BSD/Solaris

    Registration

    Thank you for your interest in the course. Unfortunately, it is fully booked.


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  • Mon
    05
    Jun
    2017
    11-12 pmRobert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    Vector Space Models represent words in a high dimensional space where “semantically” similar words are mapped to neighboring points. Such techniques have a long, rich history in the field of Natural Language Processing (NLP), but all methods depend in some way or another on the Distributional Hypothesis, which states that words that appear in the same contexts share semantic meaning. Here we share our experience in one such Predictive model, Word2vec Skip-Gram, a particularly computationally-efficient scheme for learning word embeddings from raw text.

    The shallow neural network implementation of the model applied to a large Life Science corpus results in a Semantic Bio-Knowledge Graph of nodes (corresponding to words/phrases) and edge weights determined by metrics such as the Cosine Distance between vector pairs. We explore various properties exhibited by the Semantic Bio-Knowledge graph and highlight early results that suggest novel associations that are incipient from the data (such as between genes/diseases, drugs/genes, genes/genes etc.). In particular, the Temporal Analysis of the graph yields robust predictions of certain associations well ahead of their actual occurrence in the primary literature. We believe that a larger distributed software system, nferX, built on this model can augment knowledge synthesis and hypothesis generation in an era of exponentially growing literature.

    About the Speaker

    Murali Aravamudan is a serial entrepreneur, inventor and engineer who built successful technology companies in the Media and Telecom ecosystems. Murali is currently the Founder of the Life Sciences venture nference, whose mission is to improve clinical outcomes and commercial decisions through a large scale Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology platform. Murali is a technology pioneer having authored 95 US patents and more than 100 pending patents in the areas of search, personalization, conversational interfaces, data networking, telephony and, more recently, computational biology, pharmaceutical drug discovery and molecular diagnostics.

    Earlier in his career, Murali served as Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of the Communications Software Business at Lucent Technologies and as a department head of Communications Software Research at Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill.

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  • Tue
    06
    Jun
    2017
    Tue
    25
    Jul
    2017
    Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Hands-on Lab

    Instructor: Darshak Vasavada

    Timings

    Every Tuesday in June (6, 13, 20, 27) and July (4, 11, 18, 25)
    Lectures from 5.00-7.00 pm and Lab from 7.00-7.30 pm

    Students are expected to work on the problems and platforms at home

    Syllabus

    The course is aimed for students from various fields, who do not have prior experience in electronics or programming but are interested in developing embedded systems specific to their field of technology. This course will enable students from various Science and Engineering branches to build simple embedded systems, or effectively team up with Electronics and Computer Science engineers to build embedded systems with higher complexity.

    The following topics will be discussed:

    • Microprocessor basics
    • Introduction to programming
    • Structure of a stand-alone system
    • Programming I/O devices
    • Communication between devices
    • Communication with the external world
    • Students presentations

    Prerequisite

    None. However, exposure to some programming language will be useful. If not, the student may have to put in a extra effort to learn simple programming.

    Registration

    Thank you for your interest in the course. Unfortunately, it is fully booked.


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  • Tue
    13
    Jun
    2017
    14.00-15.00Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors have become one of the most widely used sensors in the recent times for a variety of applications. In the present research work, FBG sensor based devices have been devised for newer applications in bio-medical and engineering fields. Basically, novel packaging methodologies for FBGs are developed, which transducts the measured parameter to a secondary parameter that can be sensed by the FBG.

    In the field of Cardiology, a FBG Pulse Recorder has been developed which has the ability to acquire the radial arterial pulse pressure waveform. This Pulse Recorder has been used to evaluate blood pressure, arterial compliance and pulse transit time differential. In the field of Dentistry, an FBG based bite force recorder which can record the individual tooth bite force has been developed. Also, an in-vitro study utilizing the FBG Temperature Sensor to measure the variation of temperature in the pulp chamber during light curing of composite materials has been carried out.

    In the field of Seismology, a cantilever based seismometer using a FBG sensor has been developed and tested for field conditions along with a commercial seismometer. Further, the FBG seismometer has been employed for a unique application of an elephant intrusion monitoring. Furthermore, an FBG device has been developed for displacement measurement facilitating tuneable sensitivity; this device has been exploited for vibrometry and surface profilometry.

    About the speaker

    Sharath Umesh received his B.E. Degree in Mechanical Engineering from M S Ramaiah Institute of Technology in 2009. He received his PhD from the Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science in 2016. He is presently working as a Research Associate in the Central Manufacturing Technology Institute, Bangalore.

    He is the recipient of a National Award named Prof K N Amulya Reddy Award among the Gandhian Young Technological Innovation Award 2015 held at Rashtrapti Bhavan, New Delhi for "Fiber Bragg Grating Pulse Recorder". He is the recipient of Best Poster Presentation Award in the 7th International Conference on Sensing Technology 2013 held at Wellington, New Zealand.

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  • Thu
    15
    Jun
    2017
    16.00-17.00 pmRobert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    The design of complex engineered systems requires the concerted effort of diverse stakeholders, each responsible for a part or an aspect of the overall problem. Inconsistencies emerge naturally when different parts of a system design are often concurrently modified without regard for their dependencies. Such dependencies range from easy to detect and fix to requiring costly simulations and rework. This presentation introduces modelling language engineering concepts and in particular linguistic and ontological properties as a means to reason about the relationships between different views/engineering disciplines. Subsequently, we explore the link between consistency management and design processes.

    About the Speaker
    Hans Vangheluwe is a Professor in the Antwerp Systems and Software Modelling (AnSyMo) group within the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at the University of Antwerp in Belgium, where he is a founding member of the NEXOR IOF Consortium on Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS). He is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Computer Science at McGill University, Montreal, Canada where he was tenured faculty 2000-2010.

    AnSyMo is an Associated Lab of Flanders Make, the strategic research centre for the Flemish manufacturing industry. He heads the Modelling, Simulation and Design Lab (MSDL), distributed over the University of Antwerp and McGill.

    In a variety of projects, often with industrial partners, he develops and applies the model-based theory and techniques of Multi-Paradigm Modelling (MPM) in diverse application domains.


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  • Wed
    21
    Jun
    2017
    10.00-15.00Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems

    On 21 June the Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems will organise the 1st CPS Day, where we invite all recipients of the MTech Project Awards and of the Young Faculty Awards to present their research to the interested public.

    For more information, please visit: www.rbccps.org/events/cps-day


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  • Thu
    13
    Jul
    2017
    15.30-16.15 pmRobert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    Society is rapidly advancing towards autonomous cyber-physical systems (CPS) that interact and collaborate with humans. Examples include semi-autonomous vehicles interacting with drivers and pedestrians, medical robots interacting with doctors and nurses, and many more. The safety-critical nature of these systems requires us to provide strong correctness guarantees on their performance in interaction with humans. However, the combination of intelligence and autonomy in these systems, and their interactions with humans, make them particularly challenging for verification and control.

    In this talk, I will discuss our recent work on this topic of safe and interactive autonomy and verified intelligent systems. First, I will describe a learning-based game-theoretic approach to design autonomous systems that are mindful of their effects on humans, and further leverage these effects for better efficiency, coordination, and estimation. Next, I will discuss techniques to systematically verify robustness and safety of such systems. Finally, I will discuss the broader challenges for verified artificial intelligence, and corresponding promising directions to tackle these challenges.

    About the Speaker
    Sanjit A. Seshia is a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. He received an M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, and a B.Tech. in Computer Science and Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay.

    His research interests are in dependable computing and computational logic, with a current focus on applying automated formal methods to problems in cyber-physical systems, computer security, electronic design automation, and synthetic biology. His Ph.D. thesis work on the UCLID verifier and decision procedure helped pioneer the area of satisfiability modulo theories (SMT) and SMT-based verification.

    He is co-author of a widely-used textbook on embedded, cyber-physical systems and has led the development of technologies for cyber-physical systems education based on formal methods. His awards and honors include a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, the Frederick Emmons Terman Award for contributions to electrical engineering and computer science education, and the School of Computer Science Distinguished Dissertation Award at Carnegie Mellon University.


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  • Wed
    19
    Jul
    2017
    Fri
    21
    Jul
    2017
    Faculty Hall, Indian Institute of Science

    The Symposium on Cyber Physical Systems is to bring eminent researchers in the area of CPS to Bangalore, have them interact with students and researchers from all over India, share ideas and interesting applications, and identify challenging future CPS research directions. We are organising six thematic sessions over three days:

    • Autonomous Systems and Robotics
    • Control and Optimisation for Smart Grids
    • Hybrid Systems and ControlS
    • Software Engineering for CPS
    • CPS Test Beds
    • CPS Security and Anomaly Detection

    For more information and registration, please visit the Symposium website.

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  • Tue
    25
    Jul
    2017
    15.00-16.00Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    As we move away from fossil fuels toward renewable energy sources such as solar and wind, inexpensive energy storage technologies are required. This is so since renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind, are intermittent. An alternative to batteries – which are quite expensive – is “smart loads”, such as air conditioners equipped with computation and communication capability. With appropriate software, the power consumption of air conditioning -- and many other loads -- can be varied around a baseline. This variation is analogous to the charging and discharging of a battery. Loads equipped with such intelligence have the potential to provide a vast and inexpensive source of energy storage. Two principal challenges in creating a reliable virtual battery from millions of consumer loads include (1) maintaining consumers’ Quality of Service (QoS) within strict bounds, and (2) coordinating the actions of loads with minimal communication to ensure accurate reference tracking by the aggregate.

    When the loads in question are residential loads that can either turned on or off, the coordination problem suffers from a combinatorial explosion. This talk describes our work in addressing this challenge by using randomized control, in which control actions are decided probabilistically. A key advantage of this approach is that aggregate behavior of a collection of loads can be approximated by an LTI (linear time invariant) system. Two classes of on/off loads will be considered: deferrable loads, such as water pumps, and thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) such as air conditioners. The latter is more challenging since the additional randomness introduced by weather and consumer behavior. While the former can be modeled by a finite-space space Markov chain, the latter requires an infinite state space.

    About the Speaker
    Prabir Barooah is an Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Florida, where he has been since 2007. He received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering in 2007 from the University of California, Santa Barbara. From 1999 to 2002 he was a research engineer at United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT. He received the M.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Delaware in 1999 and the B.Tech. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, in 1996.

    Dr. Barooah is the winner of Endeavour Executive Fellowship (2016) from the Australian Government, ASEE-SE (American Society of Engineering Education, South East Section) outstanding researcher award (2012), NSF CAREER award (2010), General Chairs' Recognition Award for Interactive papers at the 48th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (2009), best paper award at the 2nd International Conference on Intelligent Sensing and Information Processing (2005), and NASA group achievement award (2003).


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  • Thu
    03
    Aug
    2017
    11.00-12.00Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    Cyber-physical systems (CPS) such as automobiles, electrical grids, transportation networks and water networks, are increasingly controlled through (distributed) cyber-systems, which make them vulnerable to attacks. To secure CPS systems, just protecting bits (cyber-security) is insufficient: a sensor attack can feed wrong inputs to sensors and thus manipulate the physical signals before they get converted to bits.

    By drawing insights from error correction, we develop CPS defense strategies that leverage the physical dynamics of CPS to protect against attacks. We demonstrate such strategies for the state estimation problem in the presence of attacks on sensors and actuators. We characterize the resilience of the system, which corresponds to the maximum number of attacks that can be tolerated while successfully reconstructing the state from observations. When there is measurement and process noise, these ideas enable design of (optimal) MMSE estimation under adversarial attacks.

    We also propose computationally feasible state estimators for these problems. For the problem of designing output-feedback controllers that stabilize the system, we show that a principle of separation between estimation and control holds, even when there are adversarial attacks. We also develop ideas on how to develop secure active sensing, which could protect against individual sensor attacks in the context of anti-lock brake (ABS) sensors. We conclude the talk with a new notion of distortion security which is suitable for security for CPS systems, and show that it can also potentially enable lightweight security.

    About the Speaker

    Suhas N. Diggavi received the B.Tech. in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi,  and the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University, USA, in 1998.

    After completing his Ph.D., he was a Principal Member of Technical Staff in the Information Sciences Center, AT&T Shannon Laboratories, Florham Park. After that he was on the faculty of the School of Computer and Communication Sciences, École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland, where he directed the Laboratory for Information and Communication Systems (LICOS).

    He is currently a Professor, in the Department of Electrical Engineering, at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he directs the Information Theory and Systems laboratory.

    His research interests include wireless network information theory, wireless networking systems, network data compression and network algorithms; more information can be found at http://licos.ee.ucla.edu.

    He has received several recognitions for his research including the 2013 IEEE Information Theory Society & Communications Society Joint Paper Award, the 2013 ACM International Symposium on Mobile Ad Hoc Networking and Computing (MobiHoc) best paper award, the 2006 IEEE
    Donald Fink prize paper award.  He is currently a Distinguished Lecturer and also serves on board of governors for the IEEE Information theory society. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.


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  • Thu
    31
    Aug
    2017
    14.00-15.15Robert Bosch Centre for Cyber-Physical Systems, Seminar Hall

    During this seminar, two talks will be presented:

    Talk 1 (14.00-14.30)

    Closedocs: An indexing system to index clusters of close documents

    The cost of indexing two documents in traditional indexing systems is the same irrespective of the token overlap between two documents. In closedocs we developed an indexing scheme which indexes clusters of close documents with the aim of achieving significant CPU and space savings. This involved developing a scalable nearest neighbor retrieval scheme for retrieving similar documents in a corpus of 10s of billions of documents.


    Talk 2 (14.40-15.15)

    Practical methods for simulation of compressible flow

    Traditionally explicit methods have been used for simulating compressible flow. However, explicit methods impose strict time step restrictions based on the speed of sound. In my thesis work, we developed a semi-implicit scheme for simulating compressible flow which alleviated this acoustic time step restriction, allowing us to take much larger time steps. The method splits the compressible flow flux into two parts – an advection part and an acoustic part.

    The advection part is solved using an explicit scheme, while the acoustic part is solved using an implicit method allowing us to avoid the sound speed imposed CFL restriction. Our method leads to a standard Poisson equation similar to what one would solve for incompressible flow, but has an identity term more similar to a diffusion equation.

    I will also briefly talk about extensions of this implicit pressure solve for solid-fluid coupling and for integrating shock wave dynamics into traditional smoke simulations.

    About the Speaker

    Nipun Kwatra received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 2011. Before that he received his Masters degree from Georgia Tech in 2006 and a Bachelors degree from the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi in 2004.

    His research focused on physically based simulation with focus on computational fluid dynamics and solid fluid coupling. He has been interested in applications of simulation to both computer graphics and scientific computing.

    After his PhD he worked at Google for four years in the AdWords backend and web search infrastructure teams. In the AdWords team, he worked on systems infrastructure and ad-quality improvements. In the web search infrastructure team he worked on developing a new indexing scheme for indexing clusters of documents which yielded significant CPU and storage savings in the search serving system.

    Since then he has been working on his startup in personal videos domain, where he developed an application which reinvents the browse, discovery and sharing experience for personal videos.


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